CILIP Carnegie Medal Awardees

The Carnegie Medal in Literature is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children in the U.K. It was established in 1936, in memory of the great Scottish-born philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie. This award is U.K.'s oldest and most prestigious book award for children's writing. The medal is awarded by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.
Source: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk. All rights reserved.

This particular collection includes some notable winners of Carnegie Medal and shortlisted books from the year 1987 to 2012.

more

The Star of Kazan (2003)

Written by Eva Ibbotson

In 1896, in a pilgrim church in the Alps, an abandoned baby girl is found by a cook and a housemaid. They take her home, and Annika grows up in the servants' quarters of a house belonging to three eccentric Viennese professors. She is happy there, but dreams of the day when her real mother will come to find her. And sure enough, one day a glamorous stranger arrives at the door.

After years of guilt and searching, Annika's mother has come to claim her daughter, who is in fact a Prussian aristocrat whose true home is a great castle. But at crumbling, spooky Spittal, Annika discovers that all is not as it seems in the lives of her new-found family . . .

Eva Ibbotson’s hugely entertaining story is a timeless classic for readers young and old. Fans of Journey to the River Sea are in for an even more captivating treat in The Star of Kazan. This book is recommended for preteens ages 9 and up. (Copyright © Macmillan Children's Books/Pan Macmillan. All rights reserved.)

Source:  Pan Macmillan UK.

Eva Ibbotson, born Maria Charlotte Michelle Wiesner on January 21, 1925, was an Austrian born British novelist known for her children's books. She was born in Vienna in 1925 and moved to England with her father when the Nazis came into power.

Ibbotson wrote more than twenty books for children and young adults, many of which garnered nominations for major awards for children's literature in the UK, including the Nestlé Smarties Book Prize and the Whitbread Prize. Some of her novels for adults have been successfully reissued for the young adult market in recent years.

For the historical novel Journey to the River Sea (2001), she won the Smarties Prize in category 9–11 years, garnered unusual commendation as runner up for the Guardian Prize, and made the Carnegie, Whitbread, and Blue Peter shortlists. Set in the Amazon, it was written in honour of her deceased husband Alan, a former naturalist.

Imaginative and humorous, Eva's books often convey her love of nature, in particular the Austrian countryside, which is evident in works such as The Star Of Kazan and A Song For Summer.

She was a finalist for the 2010 Guardian Prize at the time of her death. Her last book, The Abominables, was one of eight books on the longlist for the same award in 2012.

Close

Select Version you want to order