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Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage: Stories (2001)

Written by Alice Munro

In the nine breathtaking stories that make up her celebrated tenth collection, Alice Munro achieves new heights, creating narratives that loop and swerve like memory, and conjuring up characters as thorny and contradictory as people we know ourselves.

A tough-minded housekeeper jettisons the habits of a lifetime because of a teenager’s practical joke. A college student visiting her brassy, unconventional aunt stumbles on an astonishing secret and its meaning in her own life. An incorrigible philanderer responds with unexpected grace to his wife’s nursing-home romance. Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage is Munro at her best, tirelessly observant, serenely free of illusion, deeply and gloriously humane. (Copyright © Vintage/Random House. All rights reserved.)

Source:  Penguin Random House Company.

Alice Munro is widely regarded as one of the most important short-story writers, not just in Canada but in the English-speaking world as a whole. Munro's work has been described as having revolutionized the architecture of short stories, especially in its tendency to move forward and backward in time.

Her books are Dance of the Happy Shades (1968), Lives of Girls and Women (1971), Something I've Been Meaning to Tell You (1974), Who Do You Think You Are? (1978), The Moons of Jupiter (1982), The Progress of Love (1986), Friend of My Youth (1990), Open Secrets (1994), The Love of a Good Woman (1998), Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage (2001), Runaway (2004), The View from Castle Rock (2006), Too Much Happiness (2009) and Dear Life (2012).

The recognition Munro's fiction has earned includes three Governor-General's awards (1968, 1978, 1986), two Giller Prizes (1998, 2004), and the Man Booker International Prize for lifetime achievement in 2009, as well as the Canada-Australia Literary Prize, the Commonwealth Writers' Prize (Canada and the Caribbean), and the O. Henry Award in the US for continuing achievement in short fiction. In 2005, Munro was listed as one of Time magazine’s “100 most influential people.” She was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature, cited as a "master of the contemporary short story". She is the first Canadian and the 13th woman to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Various adaptations of her stories have appeared on television. The short film of "Boys and Girls" won an Oscar in 1984. Her short story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" from her 2001 collection Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage was adapted for the screen and directed by Sarah Polley as Away from Her (2006). It debuted at the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

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